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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
-year-old jillian kenard and her sisters in jackson, tennessee. band class, a math class. but life for the kenard sisters are anything but ordinary. >> guys, it's time to get up. >> reporter: every sunday, their parents, patrick and cindy, wake them before the sunrises. they fold cots. >> we till have some more packing to do. >> reporter: and pack up their lives. jillian makes sure the birdhouse she built out of popsicle sticks, glitter and glue isn't left behind. and as evening approaches, for the 11th time in four months, they make their way to a sunday school classroom. in another church for another week. it might not seem like much, but for the next seven days, this is where they'll sleep. for the first time in their lives, the kenard family is homeless. they are the new face of american homelessness. in the wake of the recession, experts say the u.s. stands at a historic juncture. the latest government data show the number of people in homeless families living in suburban and rural america rose nearly 60% during the depth of the great recession, an unprecedented surge. more than 1 million sc
of the classic middle class, central jersey shore suburb, 80% of us have an aunt hazel. mine lived on jackson avenue in toms river. we used to visit her, go over to the beach. what have you seen in your travels and what are you learning in getting this masters degree on the jersey shore? >> reporter: well, first, let me say, i know this place as well, too. i've covered disasters all over the world, but jersey is my home as well. i'm from the northern part of the state, jersey city, montclair. down here, the story is really the destruction that you see that is just really mind-boggling. communities so hard hit that days later, thousands of people haven't been able to even see what happened because they can't come back. authorities are still keeping them out. there's a lot of anger, frustration, a lot of tension because people want to come back in and see what's happened to their homes. they also want to protect their homes. we've been hearing more stories about looting and people concerned about that. we've also heard stories about what people are calling pirates, trying to rob homes in the da
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)